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Text Book examples of information manipulation From the COVID-19 battlefield By Tinatin Khidasheli Published by RFE/RL on March 29, 2020 in Georgian

Checking the COVID-19 map, finding out the numbers of new cases and death toll have become the regular part of the daily routine for all Georgians and undoubtedly, all residents of the world. This is our new reality, the new normal. However, apart from the perfectly comprehensible and ordinary human emotion accompanying these statistics, what …

Text Book examples of information manipulation From the COVID-19 battlefield By Tinatin Khidasheli Published by RFE/RL on March 29, 2020 in Georgian Read More »

Building Resilience to the Hybrid Threats -Communicationas the main element

“The discourse of fear, separation, hate, and delegitimization harms society’s unity and solidarity. This discourse has intensified in recent years against the backdrop of widespread use of social media. The disparity between rich and poor also harms national resilience” –Moshe Ya’alon, former MODof the Israel Defense Forces. Today, I am introducing you that dimension of …

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COSTS OF CONFLICT: CORE DIMENSIONS OF THE GEORGIAN-SOUTH OSSETIAN CONTEXT

“Cost of Conflict: Core Dimensions of the Georgian-South Ossetian Context” is an analytical publication which presents diverse views of Georgian, South Ossetian and international experts. Georgian and South Ossetain peacebuilders worked together with George Mason University and the Alliance for Conflict Transformation, and with the financial support of the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund by …

COSTS OF CONFLICT: CORE DIMENSIONS OF THE GEORGIAN-SOUTH OSSETIAN CONTEXT Read More »

“He who says A must say B” – or why Tornike Sharashenidze’s Abkhazia policy fails”.

Tornike Sharashenidze’s opinion on Georgia’s policy towards Abkhazia is significant and noteworthy, especially as it seems to have been shared by quite a large portion of the Georgian society. The author criticizes the Georgian policy for being excessively sentimental, appeasing and making unreasonable concessions and calls for a more pragmatic approach. But as an ordinary reader, I am left with an impression that the article too is not entirely free of emotions (something criticized by the author himself). The feelings of grudge, anger, and frustration are just the other side of the coin and need to be restrained in politics.